Tag Archives: International Consultation on Church and Homophobia

Report from Jakarta: International Consultation on Church and Homophobia

By Joseph N. Goh at AACRE. An International Consultation on Church and Homophobia (ICCH) was held at the Jakarta Theological Seminary (JTS) in Jakarta, Indonesia from November 23 to 26, 2014. This consultative conference was co-organised by JTS, the National Council of Churches in India, the Theological Department of the Christian University of Duta Wacana, the Communion of Churches of Indonesia, the Fellowship of Women Theologians, the World Student Christian Federation-Asia Pacific, and the Christian Conference of Asia. The conference sought to introduce LGBT issues Read More +
FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailBlogger Post

International Consultation on Church and Homophobia | Day 2 | November 24, 2014

The second day of the International Consultation on Church and Homophobia began with a thought-provoking Morning Prayer. After breakfast, Dr Dédé Oetomo delivered a presentation that examined the LGBTIQ movement in Indonesia and the involvement of religions. He gave a summary on the formation of groups such as the Himpunan Wasam Djakarta (Jakarta Association of Transgender Women) in the 1960s, the Persatuan Waria Kota Surabaya (Surabaya City Association of Transgender Women) in 1978, Lambda Indonesia in 1982, Persatuan Lesbian Indonesia in 1986, and GAYa NUSANTARA in Read More +
FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailBlogger Post

International Consultation on Church and Homophobia, November 23-26, 2014, Jakarta Theological Seminary

A Gathering of Asian Churches and Seminary to Address Homophobia as Human Rights Violations Sexual minorities (lesbian, gay, bi­sexual and transgender – LGBT) have been receiving a lot of attention recently. In its accreditation guide, ATESEA mentions that member schools need to pay close attention to LGBT issues. Nevertheless, views on sexual minorities are varied. Some churches support lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, even to the point of marrying them and ordaining LGBT priests, while others accept them under certain conditions. Many people, however, Read More +
FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailBlogger Post